Untamed (2)

“I don’t fool myself into any talk about an afterlife or immortality,” she wrote in her journal. “But when I am waist-deep in a gator hole or elbow-deep in turtle guts, all I can say is: I feel a deep, visceral connection to the Source.” It couldn’t be talked about, prayed to, hoped for, understood or even sought. In rare moments, it revealed itself – in the shadows of an old-growth forest, the morning fog ghosting over the ocean, and the flickering light in the eye of a whale. It was ordinary as sunlight – and as luminous.

(Untamed, by Will Harlan.)

Untamed

Economists calculate the total value of ecosystem services – such as water purification, soil building, and pollination of food crops – at over $33 trillion each year, twice as large as the entire world’s economy. Nature does it all free of charge. Life is a diversified portfolio, but we are drawing down our capital and stealing from the future. Our economy is consuming its planetary host. The end result is inevitable: bankruptcy.

(From Untamed, by Will Harlan)

The Enchanted Life

“Because enchantment, by my definition, has nothing to do with fantasy, or escapism, or magical thinking: it is founded on a vivid sense of belongingness to a rich and many-layered world; a profound and whole-hearted participation in the adventure of life. The enchanted life presented here is one which is intuitive, embraces wonder and fully engages the creative imagination – but it is also deeply embodied, ecological, grounded in place and community. It flourishes on work that has heart and meaning; it respects the instinctive knowledge and playfulness of children. It understands the myths we live by; thrives on poetry, song and dance. It loves the folkloric, the handcrafted, the practice of traditional skills. It respects wild things, recognises the wisdom of the crow, seeks out the medicine of plants. It rummages and roots on the wild edges, but comes home to an enchanted home and garden. It is engaged with the small, the local, the ethical; enchanted living is slow living.

Ultimately, to live an enchanted life is to pick up the pieces of our bruised and battered psyches, and to offer them the nourishment they long for. It is to be challenged, to be awakened, to be gripped and shaken to the core by the extraordinary which lies at the heart of the ordinary. Above all, to live an enchanted life is to fall in love with the world all over again. This is an active choice, a leap of faith which is necessary not just for our own sakes, but for the sake of the wide, wild Earth in whose being and becoming we are so profoundly and beautifully entangled.”

The Enchanted Life, Sharon Blackie