The Big Day (part one)

The Big Day. I wake at 5.30, lie in bed with my mind racing until I give up and turn on the Calm app for my daily meditation. It’s so early that the cats don’t even jump off the bed to demand breakfast. I’m at the GP’s surgery with Lily before the receptionists are, the first in the queue for an emergency appointment. We’re told to come back at 8.50, and end up killing time in the nearest cafe, where a woman inexplicably dressed up as the Queen of Hearts makes us tea and an Americano, before disappearing into the back to handle her deliveries. The Meat Man is coming.

At the doctor’s, Lily wants me to do the talking. I explain the difficulties that she’s having, how her aggression has got out of control, and that we now want to try ADHD medication. The doctor turns to Lily.

“So now that Mum’s said everything she wants to say, how do you feel about all of this?”

Inwardly, I groan. Here we go again.

I can already tell from the doctor’s demeanour what I can expect. Oh yes, she’s friendly and acting like she’s here to help, but I’ve seen all of this before. Yet again, I’m going to be written off as a pushy, neurotic mother. For once Lily manages to speak up, explaining that she wants to try medication to try and help control her anger. The GP explains that she’s not going to send us home with any pills today, but she’ll give us a referral to the Child and Adolescent Mental Health service, that should be our first step.

I try to make it clear that this really isn’t our first step, it’s our last resort. I’ve been fighting for support for Lily for over 11 years now, and got nowhere. She’s never had the help she needs for her autism or ADHD. We’ve done CAMHS, we’ve done CYPS, we’ve done Family Therapy, we’ve done Early Bird, we’ve done art therapy and play therapy, I’ve done the two different parenting courses that they insisted on sending us on, I’ve paid privately to attend workshops on autism and challenging behaviour, even a Non Violent Communication weekend. I’ve read countless books and websites to help understand her difficulties and find better coping techniques. It’s obvious to me that Lily has additional problems; Pathological Demand Avoidance and/or Oppositional Defiance Disorder, neither of which can be treated by conventional parenting/discipline techniques, nor by talking therapies. Only, I’m not allowed to insist that these diagnoses are taken into account, because I’m her mother and not a medical professional, so if I mention this it’s another strike for the Neurotic Mother award. Of course most medical professionals won’t even recognise these as real conditions and prefer to blame the mother’s parenting style, even when you have other kids who are miraculously unaffected by your alleged poor parenting techniques. Whatever I try, it’s Catch 22. I have effectively been sitting in the GP’s office for 11 years now. This is not the first step, this is we’ve run out of options, we’ve tried everything except ADHD medication and it’s now time to give it a go.

The newspapers would have you believe that doctors were handling out Ritalin to kids like sweeties at Halloween. Yet we’ve never been offered medication, nor have I ever previously asked for it. Lily has threatened me with a knife, was suspended from school for being aggressive towards a staff member, as well as incidents with other kids for which she spent time in Isolation, and is now facing expulsion from college for being aggressive towards a tutor, including throwing a chair in class. When her anxiety is out of control, she responds with aggression. The reality is that she can’t help it; this is a neurochemical reaction caused by a diagnosable condition. No amount of talking therapy or parenting courses are going to change that. But medication might stand a chance.

I am so tired of being fobbed off by professionals. I am so tired of being treated like I’m neurotic every time I try to get Lily the support she needs. Because this isn’t actually about autism or ADHD, it’s about money. Lily wasn’t given the support she needed at school because of the costs involved. In order for her to be given a statement/EHCP, the school would have to demonstrate that they had spent £6000 on supporting her needs. Faced with ongoing budget cuts they clearly weren’t going to. I tried privately to get her an EHCP and got through to the final stage, meaning that the Educational Psychologist had identified that she did have a special educational need – but she was turned down because she’s been offered a college place. As a parent, you want to scream at that point – the issue isn’t her getting a college place, I managed that for her, but being able to stay in college. One month in, and that’s fallen apart. Oh, but here’s the kicker – the college only has places for 21 students with an EHCP, which has already been reached, so if Lily had been granted it, and been promised the support she needed, she wouldn’t have then been given a place at the college. In the meantime, the college has no budget to provide for her needs.

This is the reality for any parent of a child with SEN; it’s down to money. It’s not about their autism, their ADHD, it’s down to a decade of Tory Party cuts. If Lily is expelled, she will be classed as NEET – not in employment, education or training. I’m then punished financially for that, by having child benefit stopped, and Simon can pay less maintenance for her. So the system that has failed to provide Lily with the support she needs to remain in education – due to economic cutbacks that have benefitted wealthy Tory supporters – then punishes me financially for its own failings. Smashing, innit?

I have no choice but to smile sweetly and accept the CAMHS referral, although I pointedly ask how long the waiting list is likely to be. It could be six months, even a year, and we need help now so that Lily can return to education. We don’t have any more time, either with the GP or to wait around for another pointless referral; we’ve been through 3 rounds with CAMHS already, to no avail. Meanwhile I’ve scheduled a meeting with college this afternoon, and I need to be able to offer them something, a concrete assurance that it won’t happen again. But if I push any harder with the doctor, then it merely confirms her opinion that I’m the one with the issue, not Lily. From past experience, it’s only mothers who are treated this way, not fathers. And had Lily attended the appointment with a chaperone from college, say, the outcome may have been different again. After 11 years of struggle, I’m tired of fighting to try and get what should have been freely offered over a decade ago. When will autism be properly funded?

Past experience has shown that there are plenty of people getting paid to work within the SEN industry but none of it seems to be trickling down to support the kids that need the help. One time I attended an autism support meeting, the only parent there due to poor publicity – meanwhile the 6 professionals in attendance brought out their packed lunches and chatted away to each other, but not to me. That’s 6 professionals being paid to attend a meeting to support parents of autistic kids, which was in reality just a subsidised jolly. Or the autism support worker who only worked in schools and didn’t do home visits even when we explained that Lily was being home educated. So you’re not actually offering any kind of support then? Meeting after meeting with school staff and SENCOs with no real change, no progress, no actual support. One even questioned why Lily would qualify for DLA/PIP, before deciding for herself that her ADHD meant she’d need to eat more meat! Perhaps job descriptions for SENCOs should demand that they actually have experience of SEN? Meanwhile, I’ve a train to catch…

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